MIM Materials Range

The powders used in metal injection molding (MIM) come in a variety of chemistries, particle sizes, and particle shapes. Powder availability determines which engineering materials can be produced by MIM; fortunately, most of the widely used engineering compositions are readily available.

Alloys can be formed by mixing elemental powders, or the combination of master alloy powders with elemental powders, to match the desired alloy. Another approach is to use pre-alloyed power where each particle contains all of the elements. Ferrous alloys are popular in MIM, and nearly half of the commercial activity is in stainless steels.

Most common engineering alloys are possible with MIM, but the most popular alloys are surgical steel MIM-17-4 PH (AISI 630) and austenitic stainless steels MIM-316L (AISI 316L).

The most common alloy families are:

  • Iron
  • Low-alloy steels
  • Stainless steels

Other alloys:

Gas Atomization

Caption: Gas Atomization

  • aluminum alloys
  • bio-compatible alloys
  • carbides
  • ceramics
  • cobalt-based alloys
  • controlled-expansion alloys,
  • copper and copper alloys
  • hardmetals
  • heavy-metal alloys
  • magnetic alloys (soft and hard)
  • nickel-based alloys
  • precious metals
  • reactive metals
  • shape-memory alloys
  • specialty alloys
  • titanium and titanium alloys
  • tool steels

The Metal Injection Molding Association (MIMA) keeps a detailed list of materials for MIM; however, please contact your supplier to see if the alloy or a substitute alloy is available.

For additional information on how to specify materials for components made using the MIM process, download a copy of MPIF Standard 35—Metal Injection Molded Parts. This standard will help guide you during your design process and throughout discussions with your fabricator.

Materials List

The following list provides some materials that have been used in metal injection molding. Please check with your parts manufacturer to get an up-to-date listing of the available alloys.

Alloy Family Materials
Austenitic Stainless Steels (and Master Alloys) 303, 303L
304, 304L, 304+Ti
309
310, 310 C2, 310S, 310N
316B, 316F, 316L, 316J1L, 316Ti, 314
317, 317L
321
329, 329J1
347
904
Fe22Cr20Ni6Mo
HK30
Nickel-free stainless
Nitronic 60
Duplex Stainless Steels SAF2507
SAF2205
316 duplex
Ferritic/Martensitic Stainless Steels (and Master Alloys) 410 Series, 410L
420 Series, 418
430 Series, 430L, 434
440 Series
Fe30Cr
Fe50Cr
Precipitation-Hardening Stainless Steels 15-5PH
17-4PH
17-7PH
Low-Alloy Steels (and Master Alloys) 1010
1018
1045
1050
4130A
4140
42CrMo4
4340
4365
4650 *replaced by 4605
4605
5130
5140
8620
8740
52100
Fe2%Ni
Fe8%Ni
Fe8Cr1.9Ni2Mo
Magnetic Alloys Fe49Co2V
Fe50Ni
Fe3Si
Fe50Co
Fe6.5Si
Fe5.5Si
Alnico
Alnico 8
Sendust
Nickel-Base Alloys Hastelloy® C
Hastelloy® C22
Hastelloy® C276
Hastelloy® X
Inconel® 625
Inconel® 718
Inconel® 700 series
Monel® 400
Nimonic® 80A
Nimonic® 90
GHS4
Copper HC Cu (99.9%)
OFHC Cu
Cu10Al
Cu-Sn (1-50%)
Cu-Ni (1-99%)
Functional Alloys Invar®
Kovar®
Kovar® F15
Fe36Ni
Fe50Ni
Fe29Ni17Co
Fe-Cr (1-50%)
Fe-Ni (1-99%)
Fe-W (1-40%)
Fe36Ni-13Co
Fe35Co
Ni20Cr
Ni50Cr
Super Invar®
PB47
PB47Mn
Others Aluminum
Al2O3
Gold
Silver
Titanium
WC
ZrO2
Cobalt-Base Alloys Stellite® 6
Tool Steels & High-Speed Steels A6
D2
T42
H10
H11
H12
H13
M2
M4
S2
S7
T15